Runoff set to nail down candidates

Early voting begins Monday for May 22 contest that will also decide next Pct. 1 JP

For the third time in as many months, and the second time in May, voters are soon to head back to the polls – this time for primary runoffs May 22. Early voting starts Monday, May 14 and runs until Friday, May 18.

Parker County runoffs

Democratic voters across Parker County will cast their votes for either Andrew White or Lupe Valdez to be the Democratic nominee for governor.

Meanwhile, Republican voters in Precinct One will decide between Kelvin Miles and Damon Liles for Justice of the Peace. Because there is no Democratic candidate in the race, the next Pct. 1 Justice of the Peace will effectively be chosen in this primary runoff.

Parker County voters may vote early, from 7 a.m. to 7 p.m. May 14-18, at any of the following locations:
• Azle Masonic Lodge, 257 W. Main St.
• Aledo ISD Administration Building, 1008 Bailey Ranch Rd.
• Parker County Courthouse Annex, 1112 Santa Fe Dr., Weatherford
• Peaster Fire Department, 221 Judd St.
• Springtown Municipal Court Annex, 200 N. Main St.
• Willow Park Municipal Building, 516 Ranch House Rd., Weatherford
• Brock United Methodist Church, 127 Lazy Bend Rd., Weatherford

Don’t forget your ID

It’s a good idea to doublecheck your polling place before you head out to vote.

Take your voter registration with you if at all possible, but also be prepared to present one of the following forms of identification:
• Texas driver’s license
• Texas Election Identification Certificate
• Texas personal identification card
• Texas license to carry a concealed handgun
• U.S. military ID card with photo
• U.S. citizenship certificate with photo
• U.S. passport.

If you do not have a listed form of ID, you may be able to vote after showing another form of identification and filling out a “reasonable impediment declaration.”

Candidate Forum

In February, the Epigraph the candidates for the Pct. 1 Justice of the Peace the following questions ahead of the March 6 primary. Here are the responses from the two candidates set to face off in the May 22 runoff. 

  1. In 200 words or less, explain why you are seeking this office? 
  2. The Justice of the Peace in Texas is one of the only judgeships in the state that requires no legal education prior to being elected to the office. The office does require 80 hours of training through the Texas Justice Courts Training Center within the first year in office, and 20 hours per year every year thereafter. What education or experience have you already obtained that would benefit you in your judicial duties, and what education, if any, beyond the minimum required by the state, do you plan to obtain if elected as Justice of the Peace?
  3. Though independent offices of each other, the Justice of the Peace and the Constable of each precinct work together frequently to operate the justice court. Due to recent events, a strong chance exists that the Constable’s office for your precinct will see its third new office holder in a period of two years at the same time the JP’s office will be occupied by a newcomer for the first time in 16 years. How do you plan to ensure that the two offices work together to ensure the court continues to execute all of its responsibilities efficiently?

Kelvin Miles

  1. I have been serving my community all of my adult life. By serving, I mean being physically involved, not sitting on a board or committee or just giving money. I have served in Lions Club for over 20 years. During that time I helped build baseball fields, a Lions Club building, Lions Club Gym, mowing baseball fields, coaching hundreds of kids, building a fountain at the Springtown Square, spent four years building a train for my grandchildren, but taking it to schools, daycares, and churches for free. I also serve my church as an elder. I have been driving the Soul Train Trolley every other Sunday picking up children and adults for church for the last four years.

My family has been in Parker County for nearly 150 years; we are here to stay.  I look at this opportunity as another way to serve my community. I look at the JP office as a way to be a Christian example. I believe we need more Christian people in leadership roles. If elected, this will be my FULL time job. I also plan to continue serving this community however I can outside the JP office. 

  1. I have over 40 years of business experience in Parker County. I have over 20 years’ experience in leadership roles in the Lions Club, including leading baseball and football programs that served hundreds of children. I have taken a Dale Carnegie Leadership Course. I have attended Weatherford College. I am a hard worker and will do whatever it takes to learn what is needed to fulfill the job duties.
  2. I will be willing to communicate with and work closely with the constable to make sure we serve the people of Precinct 1 effectively and efficiently during this transition. This will be a full-time position, and I am ready to go to work.

 

Damon Liles

  1. Parker County is privileged to have one of the most recognized judicial systems in Texas and boast nothing short of highly committed elected officials and support staff. As such, it is imperative that the elected JP1 have a passion for the cause, a healthy knowledge of judicial matters, and the determination to assure success of the entire precinct. I was fortunate to grow up in a third generation law enforcement household and was exposed to all facets of law, which instilled in me a passion for the judicial system and what it means to serve the public. The responsibilities and duties of the JP1 office and the manner in which they are executed reflect not only on the JP1 office, but the entire county and its stakeholders. Of particular importance is that we maintain and perpetuate the outstanding reputation that the JP 1 court has. I want to dedicate my experience, leadership skills, and strong work ethic to the citizens of Parker County to keep the forward momentum towards excellence in the JP1 office.
  2. Upon graduation from The University of North Texas, with a Bachelor of Business Administration degree, I became a business owner in the property and casualty industry, which for the last 28 years has allowed me to deal with an abundance of legal matters with law enforcement, prosecutors, plaintiff and defense attorneys, and all levels of the court system such as property and bodily injury liability, property owner and landlord/tenant liability, contractual liability, employment practices liability, misrepresentation, fraud, and accidental/wrongful death legal matters. Being a longtime business owner has also taught me to diplomatically deal with the public, employees, administrative legalities, budgets, and financial discipline. In addition to continuous training through the Texas Justice Courts Training Center, it’s important that a JP be involved in organizations such as the Justice of the Peace and Constables Association of Texas and the Texas Justice Court Association, to remain fluent on educational and legislative issues affecting the Texas Justice Courts.
  3. As with any organization, there will be unforeseen challenges that can change the semantics of daily operations. A good leader will choose to embrace these changes and adjust accordingly to maintain course. Although there have been issues surrounding the Pct. 1 Constable’s Office in the past two years, I applaud the current JP1 and temporary acting constable for overcoming these challenges. At current, some uncertainty still exists until the final elections for both offices are complete. Over the course of several years, I have been fortunate to get to know most of the constables and deputy constables of Parker County, the current appointed constable of Pct. 1, and current potential candidates for the November election of Pct. 1 constable.  I feel absolutely certain that a cohesive working relationship and a commitment to efficiency can be maintained regardless of the outcome, as it will be our duty to everyone involved to do so.