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Are you uncouth? Take the etiquette quiz!

| May 18, 2017
Are you uncouth? Take the etiquette quiz!

Once upon a time, there were rules society followed, proper guidelines that proved to everyone that you were not a hillbilly but could, in fact, host a dinner party or eat before others with the proper utensils.
I am old enough to know that a male never offers to shake a lady’s hand unless she extends hers first.
And that a man takes his hat off instantly when entering building.
I came upon a 1987 Emily Post on Entertaining book at an estate sale and these answers were culled from it.
Here’s a quiz to see how you’d do in highfalutin company:

1.Read the rest

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Remember: Don’t forget about the ‘real world’

| May 18, 2017
Remember: Don’t forget about the ‘real world’

Never has there been a time when “news” was more in the news than it is today. Of course, for the past few months, when “news” is in the news it is more often than not preceded by the word “fake.”
Our culture has been news-obsessed for awhile, but now we have added the obsession with fake news. What’s the definition of fake news? Well, that would be news whose bias is different from my own (he said with tongue firmly planted in cheek).
So, what sources do Americans trust to get their real news about the real world? According to a recent article from the Barna Research Group the top trusted sources are: TV news (69 percent), local newspapers (50 percent), national newspapers (44 percent), online news/content sources (42 percent), social media news capabilities (34 percent), and magazines (25 percent).… Read the rest

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The Texas Revolution, Part 3: Delegates, delegates

| May 18, 2017
The Texas Revolution, Part 3: Delegates, delegates

The Convention of 1836 wrote the Texas Declaration of Independence and the Constitution of the Republic of Texas, organized the ad interim government, and named Sam Houston commander-in-chief of the military forces of the Republic.
The Convention met on March 1, 1836, in near-freezing weather in an unfinished building belonging to Noah T. Byars and Peter M. Mercer, his business partner. The building was rented for use of the Convention by a group of Washington business men who, incidentally, never got around to paying the rent.
Forty-four delegates assembled on the first day of the Convention. Fifty-nine delegates finally attended its sessions.… Read the rest

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Sizeable questions about today’s women’s wear

| May 18, 2017
Sizeable questions about today’s women’s wear

You know, with so many clothing stores relatively close, plus online shopping, one wouldn’t think that buying apparel would be such a challenge.
One would be wrong.
The older I get, the more I dread having to shop for clothes.
I really think by the time I am 50 I will be that batty old lady who is still wearing clothes from 20 years prior – not because she thinks they are retro and cool, but because she doesn’t want to shop for anything new.
And honestly, most of it is easily fixed annoyances if clothing designers and manufacturers would put forth minimal effort in listening to their customer base.… Read the rest

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Legislative session grinds toward May 29 close

| May 18, 2017
Legislative session grinds toward May 29 close

With a mere two weeks remaining until the end of the 85th regular session of the Texas Legislature, lawmakers have not yet finalized a state budget for fiscal years 2018 and 2019.
The Legislature’s 150 House members and 31 Senate members can work around the clock, if need be. Their only absolutely required accomplishment in the 140-day-long session is to produce that budget and put it on the governor’s desk. If they don’t, the governor will call them back for a special session.
House floor debates, protracted by Republican intra-party bickering, ate up the clock last week. Sheaves of mostly noncontroversial local and consent bills accumulated and died as deadlines took effect, and chances were reduced for hundreds of other bills to earn a spot on a floor-debate calendar.… Read the rest

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Ballpark memories: Yesterday, today, tomorrow

| May 11, 2017
Ballpark memories: Yesterday, today, tomorrow

I used to love the Astros (actually Colt .45s). Then the Rangers. And now the Astros again.
After not seeing but one professional baseball game in the last three years, I saw two in one week recently, both in Arlington.
Taking grandchildren to see a game with its pageantry and noise and lights – and racing dots – is one of a zillion Poppy perks.
The oldest, Link, is 10 now, and he loves going to a game.
We have had terrible luck seeing a home run; we’ve seen zero round-trippers by Texas hitters and he has never witnessed the Rangers win (0-5).… Read the rest

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How would you like to pay this debt?

| May 11, 2017
How would you like to pay this debt?

I owe, I owe, so off to work I go…
Do you ever feel that way? You go to the mailbox and find nothing but bills. Or you have enrolled in paperless billing, so you find your email inbox filling up with those monthly invoices.
Then you choose whether to pay with check, credit, debit, the sale of your plasma, renting out your first-born, or something even more creative.
Do you ever feel like you owe something to almost everyone? Well, actually, you do. I’ve got bad news, worse news, and good news.
The bad news is that, no matter how financially secure you are, you will never have enough money to pay your debt to the world.… Read the rest

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The Texas Revolution, Part 2: Voting for independence

| May 11, 2017
The Texas Revolution, Part 2: Voting for independence

The soldiers who had flocked to the army were determined to vote, regardless of how long they had actually been in Texas or whether they intended to stay. In at least one instance, in Matagorda, soldiers who had been discharged from service voted in the election while they were en route to the United States.
There was no consistency in how the votes of active volunteers were handled. In Goliad, soldiers held their own election for two delegates. In nearby San Patricio, locals refused to allow the soldiers to vote; their results were later overturned by the Convention. Soldiers turned away in Refugio simply held their own election.… Read the rest

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Stop the blame game, Boomers, says Millennial

| May 11, 2017
Stop the blame game, Boomers, says Millennial

Vindication is mine, says the Lord. Well, not today; this day it belongs to me.
(And, yes, I know the scripture says “vengeance,” not vindication, but that doesn’t work here.)
For years I have been saying those of us who were born in the early to mid-1980s do not deserve to be lumped in with “Millennials,” and now it is official – I read last week that there is a distinct difference between “old” Millennials and “young” Millennials.
The line of demarcation being the year 1988.
Let’s forget the fact that we can’t seem to settle the limits to the Millennial generation in terms of birth years.… Read the rest

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Texas House joins Senate in passing constitutional convention measure

| May 11, 2017
Texas House joins Senate in passing constitutional convention measure

The Texas House of Representatives on May 4 approved Senate Joint Resolution 2, a measure calling for a convention of the states, as contemplated and enabled by Article V of the U.S. Constitution.
The state Senate on Feb. 28 originally passed SJR 2, authored by Brian Birdwell, R-Granbury. Every member of the House and Senate who signed as a co-author or co-sponsor of SJR 2 is Republican, and no Democrat voted in favor of the resolution.
Last week, after the House approved an amended version of the joint resolution, Governor Greg Abbott said: “Today marks an important step toward restraining a runaway federal government and returning power back to the states and their respective citizens as our Founders intended.” In his Jan.… Read the rest

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